19 Mar

Other WordPress Plugin Vulnerability Data Sources Still Not Warning About Fixed or Unfixed Vulnerabilities in Easy WP SMTP

Today we have had a lot of traffic coming to our website to our posts about the vulnerabilities fixed and unfixed in the plugin Easy WP SMTP. The likely explanation is what else we have been seeing today, as in terms of dealing with the cleanup of hacked WordPress websites over at our main business and other mentions of hacked websites, we are seeing indications that the option update vulnerability that was fixed with that and possibly the other recently fixed option update vulnerability impacting many plugins are being exploited widely to change the WordPress option “siteurl” on websites to cause requests to be made to “getmyfreetraffic.com” (based on past experience with this type of vulnerability that likely isn’t the only thing the hackers are doing with the vulnerabilities on those websites).

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19 Nov

The Data in the WPScan Vulnerability Database Is Definitely Not Confirmed/Validated

Among the many lies told by the company behind the very popular WordPress security plugin Wordfence Security, Defiant, one that really stands out to us personally is a lie they told that relates to something that as far as we are aware we uniquely do when it comes to collecting data on vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins. In response to a complaint about the data they use in trying to tell people if an update to a plugin is a security update they claimed to rely on “confirmed/validated” data for that. In truth their source, the WPScan Vulnerability Database, explicitly notes that they haven’t verified the vulnerabilities in their data set. As far as we are aware we are the only ones that actually do the work it takes to confirm and validate vulnerabilities, which provides our customer with higher quality data and doesn’t leave them unaware that vulnerabilities haven’t actually been fixed. We recently ran across an instance of where the WPScan Vulnerability Database clearly didn’t do that work, where we had at first thought that maybe we had missed something that we should have noticed.

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16 Nov

No Ninja Forms, Wordfence Security is Not Trustworthy and Blacklisting IP Addresses Doesn’t Provide Effective Protection

When it comes to choosing security products and services what is lacking is nearly any evidence that they are effective, while at the same time there is plenty that shows that many of them are not. For example, over at our main business we regularly have people asking if we offer one that will really protect their website from being hacked after the one they were using didn’t prevent their website from being hacked. So why would people being using those if there isn’t evidence that they work? One of the reasons we have heard from people we have dealt with that have had their websites hacked is that they are using products and services based on recommendation of others. Since those are not going to be based on evidence, since there is a dearth of that, not surprisingly a lot of that advice is quite bad. Take as an example of that bad advice, the most recent post on the blog of the Ninja Forms plugin, which is used on 1+ million websites. We ran across that while looking if they had released a post on the vulnerability fixed a couple of days ago, when were detailing that.

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09 Nov

Wordfence Security and Wordfence Premium Fail To Protect Websites, But Defiant Is Happy to Lie and Tell You Otherwise

Over at our main business we have a steady stream of people contacting us to ask if we offer a service that will stop their websites from being hacked, a not insignificant number of them mention that they are currently using a service that claimed to do that and there website got hacked anyway. That second item obviously tells you that these service don’t necessarily work, but what seems more relevant to the poor state of security is that even when one of these doesn’t work these people are often sure that they can and do work, just the one they used didn’t. That probably goes a long way to explaining why the complete lack of evidence that these services are effective at all hasn’t been an impediment to people using them. The problem with that is not only do they end up not working well or at all, but the money spent on them could have been spent on services that actually improve security of these websites (and everyone else’s website if there services is anything like ours), but are not sold on false promises.

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08 Nov

Unlike Wordfence and Other Security Providers We Warned About WP GDPR Compliance Before Websites Started to Get Hacked

When it comes to protecting WordPress websites against vulnerabilities in plugins we provide a level of protection that others don’t for the simple reason that we do the work they don’t (but that they absolutely should be doing). The result can be seen with the plugin¬†WP GDPR Compliance, which had multiple vulnerabilities fixed in version 1.4.3.

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19 Oct

You Shouldn’t Assume That Wordfence Security or Other Security Tools Actually Provide Effective Protection

When it comes to explaining how so much money is spent on security while the results of that spending don’t seem to be appearing, a lot of the explanation seems like it can be found in the almost complete lack of evidence that those products and services marketed as providing protection provide effective protection. Considering that those are often promoted with extraordinary claims of their capabilities that seems to indicate those claims are baseless or that the developers actually know that they are false since if they actually had evidence to support them it seems unlikely they wouldn’t present that.

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07 Sep

Wordfence Security Doesn’t Protect Against Exploited Vulnerability (or Finding a Balance When it Comes To Detailing Vulnerabilities)

One of the ways we work to make sure we have the best information on vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins for our customers is to monitor the WordPress Support Forum. Through that we came across a couple of threads yesterday that involved exploitation of a vulnerability connected to the plugin Duplicator (and yet another example of the incredibly bad handling of the discussion of security by the moderators of that forum and inability for them to be willing to have a discussion to avoid those problems going forward). In looking closer at the information put out about that we noticed a couple of issues that we thought worth bringing more attention to.

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02 May

Wordfence Falsely Claims Their Data Source on WordPress Plugin Vulnerabilities is “Official” and “Confirmed/Validated”

When it comes to getting data on vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins there appear to be a lot of sources, but in reality most of the time it is really comes from the WPScan Vulnerability Database. While we think that that data source is a good option for a lot of people since it is available for free, you do get what you pay for. And anyone reusing that data should be upfront about the real source of the data and alert people to the serious quality control issues that come along with it.

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27 Apr

Wordfence Security Didn’t Actually Stop Exploitation of Vulnerability That Isn’t Really a Vulnerability

When it comes to security products and services one of the many problems is that the public often is making claims about them that are not true. Oftentimes people will claim that a product or service has successfully protected a website when they don’t know that is true. Instead they are assuming that is true because the website was not hacked while using it (that they know of), but considering that most websites don’t get hacked, that correlation does not indicate causation. We have also often seen people repeating claims that products can provide some particular type of protection which seem to be based entirely on an unsupported claim made by the makers of the product or service. Considering the many times we have seen security companies lying (in addition to many falsehoods that we can’t say whether they know what they are saying is true or not) those claims being repeated are often not true.

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